Finally…Adult Fiction for 2017

Slowly, slowly I am making progress on my To Do list. Finally tackling the last of my books read in 2017. Here is just a quick list in case you need a book or two for 2018.

The Chilbury Ladies Choir  Jennifer Ryan – World War II fiction set in England. Unfortunately, I had a difficult time connecting with this book. I was over half way through the book before I decided that I liked even one character. I’m not sure what the issue was for me. It was an OK read.

We Were the Lucky Ones  Georgia Hunter – This was inspired by a true story that made it a must read for me. Three generations of a family in Poland separated during World War II. All experience different aspects of the war but all are determined to be reunited.

The Secret Keeper Kate Morton – Highly recommend this book! Intriguing, suspenseful…a true page turner. Laurel, at sixteen, witnessing a crime and life moves on. When her mother’s death is nearing, the past rises to the surface. Laurel is determined to solve this mystery before her mother passes. Enjoyed it immensely.

A Man Called Ove – Fredrick Backman – I love Ove. The end. If you have not read this yet, read it! I was not sure at first. I began reading it and then put it down. My sixteen year old son picked it up, read it in one day, and then told me that I really needed to read it. Absolutely loved it. So bittersweet.

My Grandmother Asked Me to Telly You She’s Sorry – Fredrick Backman – After reading A Man Called Ove, I decided to try another book from Backman. My Grandmother was completely different from Ove but I still loved it. It took me a bit longer to really engage with the characters but I’m so glad I hung with it and finished it.

The Awakening of Miss Prim Natalie Sanmartin Fenollera  An accomplished, intelligent young lady, Prudencia Prim, leaves her life behind to become a private librarian in a small, charming community. And here she discovers that everything she has thought or known is challenged. I was not sure what I expected when I began this book but it is a favorite of mine now. I have already gifted a copy of it. I highly recommend it.

The Curious Charms of Arthur Pepper  Phaedra Patrick  This book reminded me of Major Pettigrew’s Last Stand and yes, I enjoyed it just as much. Why am I drawn to ready about older characters? Perhaps because I am aging at an alarming rate? I have no idea. But I found Arthur Pepper charming, indeed.

 

I am fairly confident that I read more adult books than this. However, I am drawing an absolute and complete blank. (Already doing better at tracking for 2018!)

I do enjoy reading Christian Fiction. Unfortunately I can’t remember which books I read in 2017. Some I was able to get from my library, a few were on Kindle, and I even had to do inter-library loan for a couple. I was jumping in and out of different series. I honestly can’t remember which I read when in the past  year! So I’m going to list a few authors of Christian Fiction that I really enjoyed and you can take it from there!

Jen Turano Out of the Ordinary was the latest one that I read. She makes me smile when I read her books.

Liz Johnson – I have found Prince Edward Island series enjoyable to read.

Pepper Basham  She has some lovable, real characters.

Kristi Ann Hunter – I am so enjoying the Hawthorne House series. I am ready to read the fourth book, An Inconvenient Beauty. But my library doesn’t have it! And I can’t use inter-library loan until the book is six months old. Kristi, do you have any review copies? hee hee.

Roseanne M. White – I started her Shadows Over England Series in January. Excellent!

 

**Disclosure – This post contains affiliate links. If you click on a link and make a purchase, I receive a very small percentage. Your shopping and buying experience is not affected in any way. I just happen to earn a few cents that I put toward books for our homeschool. Thanks for stopping by!

Unusual Chickens for the Exceptional Poultry Farmer by Kelly Jones

I happened upon this intriguing book title while perusing the library. The book basket for a few kiddos was in need of a refill and this book seemed to be the perfect read.

As soon as I saw the cover of Unusual Chickens for the Exceptional Poultry Farmer, I knew I wanted to give it a quick read through. How could you not? A book with a cute cover and is a story about chickens. And not just any chickens but unusual chickens!

Sophie Brown ,12, has left behind her life in LA to live on her Great Uncle Jim’s farm. Uncle Jim has passed away and left the farm to Sophie’s parents. Farming is a new endeavor to the whole family. With parents busy with work, Sophie sets her mind to learn about the farm. At first it appears to be a farm devoid of any farm animals until Sophie begins to spot a chicken or two while exploring the farm. Even to Sophie’s inexperienced eye, there seems something unusual about these chickens.

What is a gal to do? Instead of keeping a diary, Sophie writes letters to her deceased Abuela and Uncle Jim to help her think through how to handle various situations . She even seeks the help from the Redwood Farm Supply Company. Through these letters we learn along with Sophie how to manage exceptional poultry, stealing neighbors, and adjusting to a new community.

Sophie learns much about responsibility, friendship, and chickens. It is a delight to share her story. I really loved the presentation via the letters written by Sophie. Unusual Chickens is excellent for ages 10 and up. No interest in raising chickens is necessary to enjoy this read. I passed this along to my eleven year old daughter and she found it enjoyable. In her words, “It is a fine book for young girls.”

While my daughter read this independently, Unusual Chickens would work beautifully as a fun read aloud. It is perfect for summer reading to beat the heat!

Greek Morphemes – A Review

This post contains a review of Greek Morphemes Lessons (It’s NOT Greek to Me!)from Ready to Teach

Building a rich and full vocabulary provides the foundation for excellent reading and expression of one’s own ideas. One way to build that rich vocabulary is through studying Greek and Latin. At this time, the study of the roots of these two languages was my goal for a few of my students instead of the full languages. Greek Morphemes Lessons (It’s NOT Greek to Me!) from Ready to Teach has become a part of my son’s daily work.

When our package arrived it contained the Instructor’s Manual with a PowerPoint CD and a Student Book. The Greek Morphemes book covers over 200 morphemes (roots, prefixes, and suffixes) in twelve lessons. At first glance, I thought the program might take a bit more time than I was expecting in implementing it. After a brief read through, I realized I was mistaken. Greek Morphemes is very easy to begin using; it is almost an open and go resource.

The Instructor’s Manual contains the lessons and answers keys, transparency masters, tests and answer keys and pre-made study cards. The method of doing the lessons is explained and what each activity the student will work through is explained. After this the instructor’s manual is basically answer keys and tests. Since I was using this with only one student, we had no need for the transparency masters. The pre-made study cards are printed on colored cardstock paper for durability.

The PowerPoint files are broken down by lessons. The student simple uses the slides marked for the lesson he is on. Previous morphemes used may be reviewed and then new morphemes are introduced. The PowerPoint files also include self-reviews for the lessons. It is basically a chart with the morpheme at the top with possible meanings below it. The student clicks on the correct meanings. If it is incorrect, the program will let him know and the student re-tries. A very simple, no frills review that is quick and effective.

As the student works through the presentation, he takes notes writing down the meanings.  Then it is on to the assignments.The assignments include breaking down and defining parts of words. An example is the word anthropophobiac. The student would do this:

anthrop = man; mankind

phobiac = one who has morbid fear of

*M.D. = one who has a fear of mankind

**D.D. = one who has an intense fear of human society

(M.D. is “my definition”. D.D is “dictionary definition”.)

After defining the words, the student tackles context clues by using the words in sentences to show their meanings. The creativity continues when the student is asked to create two new words using the Greek morphemes they have learned.

The next assignment gives the students words that need to be broken apart and defined. Words such as polyheterodemologist or diademoscope might be on the list. No problem, right? Then a simple matching quiz tells the student if they were correct on the word break down.

At the back of the student book, colored paper to use for making study cards is provided. The paper is normal weight copy paper so the cards will not hold up long term but should be sufficient for use over twelve lessons.

**Special Note: We also received a flash drive containing the PowerPoint files. Previously the program came with a CD but Ready to Teach will begin to use flash drives instead. This better serves the teachers and students as many computers no longer utilize a CD/DVD player. We used both over the past few weeks.

How We Used Greek Morphemes

Greek Morphemes is being used by my son who is thirteen. After looking over the material, I decided that this would be perfect for independent study. The lessons naturally fall into a weekly set up. Each Monday he begins a new lesson by watching the appropriate PowerPoint files and then tackles Assignment A. He works through an assignment a day until he is done and then he takes the test.

The assignment on Context Clues where he had to write sentences was a bit daunting at first. However, he simply watched the slides again, I helped him work through a couple of words, and then he progressed with no issues. Other than checking his work, I haven’t been needed much at all.

Our Thoughts

I was surprised at how well my son took to Greek Morphemes. When it arrived he was not exactly excited. However, once he got started, I have rarely had to remind him to work on it. I asked what his thoughts were on this program and he said, “I love it! It’s fun, easy, and I get to make up my own words. I would rate it ten stars out of a possible five stars.”  Folks, he really enjoys this resource!

And it is working. It isn’t just because it is fun or easy. He is constantly making up new words and using them. Words like microbibliophobia (fear of small books) or phonomanicphobia (a fear of a madness for sound). I always look forward to what he is going to come up with and we all get a good laugh. All laughing aside, he is building a great foundation for a full, rich vocabulary.

Interested?  You can work through a sample lesson.

Ready to Teach also has a Latin Morphemes course as well. After a great experience with Greek Morphemes, I think we will definitely move on to Latin next.

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