New Books on the Way!

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In an effort to live in denial about how far behind I am on sharing what I have read this year, I decided to share a few new books that are on the way! I am always on the look out for new reads for the many book devourers that live in my house. Lately I have had a challenging time finding picture books for my younger crew. But! I happened to stumble across a few that I think my kiddos will enjoy.

 

We have all enjoyed the first two books in Jon Klassen’s Hat Trilogy Series: I Want My Hat Back and This is Not My Hat. The final book in this trilogy, We Found a Hat,  will be available on October 11th.

My library has it on order and I have already put in a request for it. While the books are marketed for the 4-8 year old range, you will likely find yourself smiling and enjoying a chuckle or two. A little humor, a bit of mischief, and some great characters make these excellent for the book basket.

If You Give a Mouse a Cookie…is always a favorite picture book read aloud in our house. I am fairly confident that my kiddos and I could recite this book.  I might have been a wee bit excited to see that Laura Numeroff has a new book to add to this series: If You Give a Mouse a Brownie.

This is to be released October 18th and yes, my library has it on order and I have it requested. I think we will definitely have to whip up a batch of brownies when we read this one!

And another favorite author is Sandra Boynton. Love having her board books in a basket for my youngest book lovers. I must confess that Barnyard Dance might be my favorite. There is a new board book to add to your collection!

Dinosaur Dance was released yesterday, August 30th. I might have to toss this one in my cart to purchase because my library doesn’t even have it on order!!  It will make a great stocking stuffer for someone in my house.

Are there any new books you are looking forward to sharing with your children? Or even new books for yourself? Please let me know. I am always eager to add to our book stash!

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Children and the Worship Service

When our oldest children were babies and toddlers, their time at church was spent in the church nursery. I actively participated as a nursery volunteer and at times even served as nursery director. As our children grew older and more children were added to our family, out thoughts on children’s programs, nursery, and worship changed.

We came to believe that instead of nursery or children’s church that being beside us in worship was where our children needed to be.  While it would be lovely if I could say that my children were perfectly behaved, well, it would be beyond misleading. I have spent many Sundays stepping out of the sanctuary with a little one who was fussy, or tired, or loud, or squirmy. In all honesty, I thought one of my children may never grow into the ability to sit through a worship service.

There were some Sundays when I spent very little time in the worship service. I suppose you could stand up and say that this is exactly why nursery and children’s church is needed. And I wholeheartedly disagree. We step out and we go back in. Because worship is important. And our children realizing and understanding how important it is makes it worth every trip in and out of the sanctuary. Every Sunday bouncing a baby in the back. Every pencil and piece of paper shoved in my bag for my little ones to “take notes” on.

A writer I am not. I frequently struggle to find the right words to express myself. This is why I love this article, Should Children Sit Through Big Church by John Piper. He says so well what I wish I could convey. The Family: Together in God’s Presence was written by John and Noel Piper in 1995 but is an excellent article with practical advice.

While I am still dealing with a squirmy two year old on Sunday mornings, I also get to see what is on the other side. I see my teens engaged, taking notes, commenting on sermons, and recognizing good, solid, biblical teaching. I see my younger children singing, listening, soaking in the scripture from the pulpit. And there is nothing more beautiful than seeing my family, together, in worship. Beautiful, indeed.

 

Let’s Visit Awhile. . . in England

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If only I was really in England!  No doubt my afternoon reading would absolutely lovely sitting in the English countryside. And that is exactly how I’m spending many of my free moments…reading!

It would probably be an interesting idea to actually post about the wonderful books I have enjoyed with my children and in my own private reading. I could even share about the ones that I sat to the side. It is rare that I don’t finish a book but it does happen! Unfortunately,  I am so far behind in reviewing/sharing what I have read, I don’t even know where to begin.

So, why not just share a book that I am reading and enjoying very much right now?

The Trouble with Goats and Sheep (Joanna Cannon) is set in the late 1970s in a English neighborhood. There is a wide cast of characters but the story is pulled along by Grace and Tilly, two young girls looking for God. If they find God, then Mrs. Creasy will be found. This has a bit of mystery/suspense, diverse and engaging characters, and absolutely lovely language. Ms. Cannon has a lovely way with words that create pictures for feelings, mood, and atmosphere.

“I stared past the vicar to Enid’s coffin, and thought of the ninety-eight years which lay inside. I wondered if she’d thought of them too, alone on her sitting room carpet, and I hope perhaps that she had. I thought about how she’d be carried from the church and through the graveyard, past all the Ernests and the Mauds and the Mabels, and how ninety-eight years would be put inside the ground, for dandelions to grow across her name. I thought about the people that would forever walk past her, on their way to somewhere else. People at weddings and christenings. People taking a shortcut, having a cigarette. I wondered if they would ever stop and think about Enid and her ninety-eight years, and I wondered if the world would have a little remembering left for her.” p 88

I just happened to stumble across The Trouble with Goats and Sheep one evening while browsing Pinterest. I wish I could remember where? Someone had it on a “must read in 2016” type of list. Spending so much time in children’s literature, I have to purpose to make time for adult selections.

“It was strange how different people’s kitchens could be. Some were shouty and confused, like Mrs. Dakin’s, and some kitchens, like Eric Lamb’s, hardly made a sound. A clock tick-tocked above the doorframe and a fridge whirred and hummed to itself in the corner. Other than that, there was silence as we ran the taps and stared through the window and washed our hands with Fairy Liquid. Next to the stove were two easy chairs, one crumpled and sagging, the other smooth and unworn. Over the back of each were crocheted blankets, reams of multicolored yarn stretched together in a shout of color, and on the dresser was a photograph of a woman with kind eyes. She watched us dry our hands and take lemonade from Eric Lamb, and I wondered if it  had been her patience which had woven together the strands of wool, for a chair she could no longer sit in.”  p.182

I’m just a bit over halfway finished with my reading and am eager to see how the lives of this little neighborhood are going to end. I’m taking it slow and enjoying my time sitting on the wall with Grace and Tilly.

“I still hadn’t learned the power of words. How, once they have left your mouth, they have a breath and a life of their own. I had yet to realize that you no longer own them. I hadn’t learned that, once you let them go, the words can then, in fact, become the owners of you.” p.187

What have you been reading this summer?