Children Are Born Persons – Charlotte Mason

My reading pace of A Philosophy of Education (Charlotte Mason) is moving a bit slower than I had originally planned. I find that I often go back and re-read portions of the text over again. I think that it is quite possible that you could offer up selections of Miss Mason’s writings and people would think it addressing the current educational status.

And so I am just now finishing up my thoughts on Chapter 2, Children Are Born Persons. Why has it taken me so long? I wondered if perhaps I was missing something during my reading. The concept is so simple…perhaps in Miss Mason’s time it was not so. And perhaps we are still struggling with it as well.

A child is a born person. A child has his own personality and characteristics. A child has his own interests or abilities. A child has a mind that can do amazing things! Perhaps we feel education would be easier if a child were an empty pitcher that we filled with the beverage of the day. But they are not puppets on a string! Children have amazing abilities to think, learn, create, imagine, and comprehend. We just need to present them with the ideas, the inspiration, the words.

Children are born persons. We do them an injustice when we treat them as anything less. They are able to think, to understand, to accomplish. Are we giving our children the opportunity to thrive? Are we offering a feast of ideas? So often my children leave me speechless at what they have gathered from their books. Those minds are constantly at work. Don’t underestimate the children!

“We may not take things casually as we have done. Our business is to give children the great ideas of life, of religion, history, science; but it is the ideas we must give, clothed upon with facts as they occur, and must leave the child to deal with those as he choose.” p 40

 

 

What I Read – February 2018

At first glance, I felt that my February reading was a bit disappointing. Once I really looked back over my list, I realized that I had read really great books!

This list is my personal reads as well as chapter read alouds to my children. Hopefully I can add in picture books for February later.

The Diary of Young Girl – Anne Frank – Surprisingly I do not recall having read this during high school. For the Redeemed Reader 2018 Reading Challenge, I needed to read a few biographies. Since two of my daughters had chosen to read about Anne Frank, I decided to join them. I must confess that I did not really enjoy this selection. World War II fiction is one of my favorite ares of reading. I began this prepared to love it. I’m not sure why it did not resonate with me. Perhaps, when I realized that I was not enjoying it, I should have set it aside for a later read.

However, I reminded myself as I read it that this diary of Anne’s was representative of all of those who were unable to leave anything behind or we never found a trace of them again. So many who are gone; lost forever to us. So many children and families taken during this horrid time. My two daughters did enjoy The Diary of a Young Girl. They can’t all be a good fit, right? (My daughters who read it were 14 and 17. There is a portion in the diary where Anne discusses changes in her body and some thoughts leading from that. This portion may make this selection not suitable for some families. )

Macbeth and The Tempest – William Shakespeare were also completed during February. I read these with my children during our Gathering each day. For the first time in my life, I am truly enjoying Shakespeare. Reading it aloud with everyone taking parts is great fun. Macbeth was a bit heavy but following it up with The Tempest was perfect. I thoroughly enjoyed The Tempest . It is definitely my favorite Shakespeare play so far!

On the Edge of the Dark Sea of Darkness – Andrew Peterson  This is book one of the Wingfeather Saga. My older children read this series years ago and I never made it a priority to do the same. I finally decided that I wanted to read them. The best way to make sure I finish a book in a timely manner is to make it a read aloud. My children are great motivators for “one more chapter”!

The original plan was to read this to my younger ones. My husband just happened to hear me read a chapter and we switched to it being our evening family read aloud. The Dark Sea of Darkness really makes an excellent book across the ages. It is adventurous, witty, humorous, and has most excellent footnotes throughout the book. I’d love to go and visit Oskar’s book shop!  I highly recommend this book. I am so glad that I decided to share it with my children! Book Two, North! or be Eaten, is on its way.

The Grave’s a Fine and Perfect Place – A Flavia de Luce novel – Alan Bradley This is the latest release in the Flavia de Luce series. I knew it was set to be released so I was diligently stalking my library to see when it was on order. As soon as I saw it, I put it on hold. I am always a bit fearful of series; especially when you get several books into the series. There is always that possibility that the author carries the characters for too long. But oh, sweet Flavia, I have loved each and every one in this series. The Grave’s a Fine and Perfect Place did not disappoint! At all!

I enjoy a mystery now and then but the mystery aspect of Flavia is not the draw for me. The characters, especially Flavia and Dogger, and how they personally and their relationships have grown and changed in this series is the real hook for me. Bradley has done amazingly well at capturing young Flavia’s personality. So witty, humorous, and heart wrenching at times. Love it! Mr. Bradley, please, please, tell me there is more Flavia de Luce in the future!

Before We Were Yours – Lisa Wingate. I can’t recall where I first saw this book mentioned. When I saw my library had it, I immediately put it on hold. I was like number 368 in line. Then when it finally arrived at my local branch, I couldn’t get there in time to get it! After four days, it went to the next person in line. I put it back on hold. And yes, I was again like 300 and something. It took me months to get this book in hand. It was so worth the wait!

This story, while fiction, is based on real life events. It tells the story of the Memphis Tennessee Children’s Home run by Geogia Tann and the devastation and heart break that she brought on so many families. Children were literally stolen from their families and sold to families of wealth and high society. Tann ran this “orphanage” from the 1920s to 1950s. So many children were lost to their parents forever.

Before We Were Yours tells the fictitious story of a group of five siblings and how they were ripped apart after being taken from their home. In the orphanage, children were starved, abused, and neglected; many of them died. This was a deeply moving and powerful story. It made me smile and it definitely made me cry. So thankful for those who were able to be reunited with their families; heartbroken for those who were lost forever. I highly recommend this one.

I’d love to hear about what you read in February and definitely what you are reading now! You can check out my GoodReads to see what I am currently reading.

 

 

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What I Read – January 2018

Looking back over the month of January, despite how it felt, I think I have a respectable list of books read! I’m going to share my personal reading and then in a separate post share our read alouds and picture books.

Children’s Fiction/Young Adult

The Vanderbeekers of 141st Street (Karina Yan Glaser) This was a delightful read! It truly was. If you enjoy books such as The Saturdays, The Moffats, Treasure Seekers, or The Penderwicks, you will likely feel right at home with The Vanderbeekers. A fun, loving, lively family that receives heartbreaking news. They are faced with having to move out of their beloved brownstone in New York! But the Vanderbeekers kids are determined to stay in the home that is full of so many memories.

A couple of my children finished this before me and they kept encouraging me to make time to finish it. I’m glad that I did. A really fun read was just what I needed at the beginning of January. It would make a great read aloud! Keep an eye out! There is a second Vanderbeeker book that may be out in late September, 2018!

The Boy on the Porch (Sharon Creech) This one made its way into my January stack based solely on the author. A young boy with a simple, vague note is left on a porch. A couple steps outside in the morning and discover a sleeping boy. They soon find that while the boy does not speak, he has a unique way of expressing himself especially through art. While the couple seek to find the boy’s family, their hearts long for him to stay. Then the boy’s father arrives and their lives are never the same.

Unfortunately, I found The Boy on the Porch awkward? The story never seemed settled in a place or time (and perhaps it wasn’t suppose to) and I struggled with knowing what audience this story was for. It clearly speaks of foster care and the beauty in that but is it for adults? Or older children? Maybe I should have put it down and saved it for a different time.

The Fault in Our Stars (John Green) With all honesty, I began this book totally prepared to dislike it. It made it to my January stacked based solely on a friend’s reading of the book. Hazel is dying. There is no way around the hard truth that she has terminal cancer and eventually the miracle drug that is keeping her alive will at some point fail. It appears that Hazel is waiting for that moment. Then she meets Augustus Waters, falls in love, and finds purpose in living what is left of her life.

Confession: Despite my bias going into The Fault of Our Stars, I found that I did enjoy  the story of Hazel and Augustus. There were aspects that met my expectations for this book such as crude conversation and physical relationships. Those added nothing to the story but I suppose it is expected in young adult fiction? However, it was ultimately two young people facing death with no hope of anything beyond that final moment. That, for me, was the most heartbreaking. We are all dying. But do we realize that the story doesn’t end there? None of my teens have read this book. My fourteen year old daughter would be moved by this story but due to some of the content, she will not be reading it.

Adult Fiction

A Name Unknown and A Song Unheard (Roseanna M White) These are the first two books in the Shadows of England series. Christian, historical fiction that takes place during World War I; perfect!. There are times when I need the literature equivalent to a “chick flick”. That was initially the reason I had A Name Unknown. My desire was for a light, easy read before bed. However, these books were not fluff. Mrs. White has successfully taken us back into time to meet a wide cast of characters. I enjoyed A Name Unknown; I enjoyed A Song Unheard even more. I am eagerly awaiting An Hour Unspent (hopefully released this year).

The Lake House (Kate Morton) Last year I read Secret Keeper and wasn’t sure that The Lake House could match it. I was so wrong!  A young boy goes missing and is never found. A mystery over the years…seemingly forgotten. Then a detective stumbles upon an abandoned house and the missing young boy is once again sought after.

After a couple of chapters I was completely hooked on this story and could not wait to finish it. Having to deal with the interruptions of life was quite bothersome! It was such a bittersweet story. I love how Morton flows from the past to the present and seamlessly shifting from various characters. I highly recommend if you enjoy family dynamics and suspense.

The Bookshop on the Corner (Jenny Colgan) Nina, a librarian who loves to match people and books, finds herself unemployed as the library shifts to a more technological focus and audience. This spurs shy, quiet Nina to make drastic changes in her life. She buys a truck and sets up a mobile bookshop in Scotland. Nina embraces the small, Scottish community and discovers who she really is.

I had high hopes for The Bookshop but was a bit disappointed. I was not particularly fond of Nina and that makes it challenging when you don’t care for the main character. When the last section of the book seemed to be highlighting her physical relationship with someone, I resorted to skimming the pages to get to the end.

Maisie Dobbs (Jaqueline Winspear) – My daughter actually selected this book for me to read. I need a few mysteries to check off our our reading challenge this year so I had my daughter pull one from the library shelf that looked interesting. She actually chose a Maisie Dobbs’ book that is later in the series. So we requested the first one and I’m glad that we did. In this first book, we meet Maisie Dobbs, learn about her past, and discover why she is a successful investigator. I’m sure you could read various books in the series without this knowledge but I think the enjoyment would be a bit out of balance.

I found this a great read and perfect for my evening reading. It was interesting and engaging with a nice bit of history to it. (I do love historical literature!) It takes place after World War I and that war directly affects some of the characters and plays a major role in the story line. There were no language concerns or inappropriate behavior so I will be passing this along to my daughter (14) who enjoys a good mystery. If you need a mystery or two, give Maisie a try.

What did you read in January? What is in you current reading pile? Check in with my Instagram or Facebook page to see what I am reading throughout the week.

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